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ASA $Indexes

 

Though EPDs allow for the comparison of genetic levels for many economically important traits, they only provide a piece of the economic puzzle. That’s where $ indexes come in. Through well-conceived, rigorous mathematical computation, $ indexes blend EPDs and economics to estimate an animal’s overall impact on your bottom line. The same technology that led to the dramatic progress in swine, poultry and dairy genetics over the last several decades was used to develop the following $ indexes:

All-Purpose Index (API): Evaluates sires for use on the entire cow herd (bred to both Angus first-calf heifers and mature cows) with the portion of their daughters required to maintain herd size retained and the remaining heifers and steers put on feed and sold grade and yield.

Terminal Index (TI): Evaluates sire for use on mature Angus cows with all offspring put on feed and sold grade and yield.

Using API and TI: First, determine which index to use; if you’re keeping replacements use API, if not, TI. Then, just as with EPDs, zero in on the unit difference between bulls. (As described above, index units are in dollars per cow exposed.) The difference can be used to determine how much a bull is worth compared to another. Or, put another way, how much you can pay for one bull compared to another.

https://simmental.org/site/index.php/learning-library/genetic-selection-tools/epd-faqs/60-quick-reference-to-asa-epds-and-indexes

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Resources

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Angus $Indexes

Grid Value ($G), an index, expressed in dollars per carcass, to predict profitability differences in progeny due to genetics for carcass grid merit compared to progeny of other sires. The underlying objective assumes producers will market cattle on an above-industry-average carcass grid. Traits included in the index are as follows (in no particular order): carcass weight, marbling, ribeye area, and fat.

Beef Value ($B), a terminal index, expressed in dollars per carcass, to predict profitability differences in progeny due to genetics for postweaning and carcass traits. This terminal index assumes commercial producers wean all male and female progeny, retain ownership of these animals through the feedlot phase and market these animals on a carcass grid. Traits included in the index are as follows: yearling weight, dry-matter intake, marbling, carcass weight, ribeye area and fat.

Combined Value ($C), an index, expressed in dollars per head, which includes all traits that make up both Maternal Weaned Calf Value ($M) and Beef Value ($B) with the objective that commercial producers will replace 20% of their breeding females per year with replacement heifers retained within their own herd. The remaining cull heifer and steer progeny are then assumed to be sent to the feedlot where the producers retain ownership of those cattle and sell them on a quality-based carcass merit grid. Expected progeny differences (EPDs) directly influencing a combined index: calving ease direct (CED) and maternal (CEM), weaning weight (WW), yearling weight (YW), maternal milk (Milk), heifer pregnancy (HP), docility (DOC), mature cow weight (MW), foot angle (Angle), claw set (Claw), dry matter intake (DMI), marbling (Marb), carcass weight (CW), ribeye area (RE) and fat thickness (Fat).

https://www.angus.org/Nce/Definitions

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